Below are tabs with more information about Dr. Borrett's teaching and courses.

  • Schedule
  • Survey of Biological Research
  • Network Science
  • Ecology Lecture
  • Ecology Lab
  • Ecological Modeling Lecture
  • Ecological Modeling Lab
  • Ecological Thought
  • Systems Ecology
  • SEEL Meetings
  • Research Students
  • Advising
  • ENA Workshops

Borrett Teaching Statement (updated 1/3/2010)

Dr. Borrett's teaching schedule:

Fall 2016

  • Bio534 & Biol534 Fundamentals of Ecologial Modelling & Lab
  • HON120 - Living in a Connected World: The Power, Beauty, Science, and Mathematics of Networks

Spring 2017

  • BIO 366 Ecology Lecture
  • BIOL 366 Ecology Laboratory

Past Courses

• Ecology. UNCW Bio366

• Ecology Laboratory. UNCW Biol366

• Bringing Home the Biosphere. UNCW Bio495

• Fundamentals of Ecological Modelling. UNCW BIO534 & BIOL534

• Ecological Thought: Past to Present. UNCW BIO602

• Systems Ecology and Ecological Network Analysis. UNCW Su 2011, Beijing Normal University Su13

Ecological Network Analysis

May 2016 @ ISEM2016. Here is a link to the workshop materials

August 2015 @ ESA (#esa100). Here is a link to the workshop materials.

March 2011 @ Northern Arizona University: Workshop: Introduction to Ecological Network Analysis

• R Tutorial (with Matt Lau). UNCW Su2011

• 2006. Stanford University. Fundamentals of Ecological Modeling. Undergraduate and graduate course. Co-instructor: K.R. Arrigo. Stanford, CA.

• 2003. Institute of Ecology. Ecological Thought: Past to Present. Required course for ecology graduate students. Co-instructors: B.C. Patten, S.J. Whipple. Athens, GA. syllabus

• 2003. Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. Ecosystem Complexity in the Marine Environment – Seeking an Answer to the Question: What is Biocomplexity? Three week short course for undergraduate and graduate students. Co-instructors: P.G. Verity, M.E. Frischer, B.C. Patten, S.J. Whipple. Skidaway, GA.

• Guest Lecturer and Teaching Assistant. 2002. Institute of Ecology. Theory of Systems Ecology. Graduate course. Professor: B.C. Patten. Athens, GA.

 

 

hon120

Fall 2013

Teaching Philosophy;

Bloom's Taxonomy of Intellectual Behavior (1, 2)

Schedule

#
Date
Topic/Activity
Reading
Assignment Due
1
8/26
Course Introduction (notes)
 
9/2
Labor Day - no class
2
9/9

Dr. Finelli, Chair

Dept. Biology and Mairne Biology (notes)

3
9/16

Business of Science (notes)

research synopsis
4
9/23

Dr. Frampton, Virology

(Meet in Dobo Hall 110)

5
9/30
Dr. Kamel, Marine Biology (notes)
research synopsis
6
10/7
Dr. Rhodes, Microbiology (notes)
research synopsis
7
10/14

Dr. Covi, Physiology (notes)

research synopsis
8
10/21
research synopsis
9
10/28

Dr. Long, Ecology (notes)

research synopsis
10
11/4

Dr. Wilbur, CMS Oyster Hatchery

meet at Center for Marine Science

research synopsis
11
11/11
Dr. Pyott, Physiology

 

research synopsis
12
11/18
Dr. Erwin, Microbial Ecology (Notes)
research synopsis
13
11/25
Dr. Brander, Ecotoxicology
research synopsis
14
12/2

Dr. Taylor, Tour Microscope Facility

(meet in Dobo 131)

research synopsis

HON120: Network Science

 

1 hour seminar, Fall 2015

Description

We are linked through a myriad of networks. Google lets us search the World Wide Web of information, Facebook helps us stay in touch with friends, and LinkedIn promises to help us find jobs. We use
transportation networks to move ourselves and goods, power grids to distribute our power, and even our language can be bound into web like word clouds. Darwin recognized the tangled webs of life that are
central to evolution by natural selection. In this interdisciplinary honors course, students will discover the emerging area of network science. Students will explore the diversity of networks in our social, technological, and natural world, and learn about tools to model and analyze them. Upon completion, successful students will be able to identify and describe network patterns common in complex systems, along with their relative weaknesses and strenghts.

Sylabus

Network Photo Project

(Flickr Group)

Reading Discussions

Reading Proposal List

Advice for leading and participating

Schedule

Fall 2015 Schedule
C# Date Subject Materials Homework
1

24 Aug

Introduction to Networks

(notes)

Required

Manuel Lima: A visual history of human knowledge

Recommended

Eric Berlow: Simplifying complexity (TED ~4 min)

Homework 1 (Due C#2)

 

2 31 Aug

Network Foundations 1

(notes)

Required

Shirky 2008 Ch2

Barabasi 2012 Network Takeover. Science

Recommended

Clay Shirky: How the Internet will (one day) transform government (TED ~ 20 min)

Digital Footprint | Michelle Clark (TEDx)

 

Homework 2 (Due C#3)
  7 Sept Labor Day - No Class
3 14 Sept

Network Foundations 2

(notes)

Required

Watts & Strogatz (1998) Small Worlds

Barabasi (2008) Scale Free Networks

Recommended

Eric Berlow and Sean Gourley: Mapping ideas worth spreading

Rachel Botsman: The currency of the new economy is trust

Homework 3 (Due C#4)
4 21 Sept Guest Lecture - David Hines    
5 28 Sept Network Foundations 3

Required

none

Reading Proposals (Due C#5)

Reading Proposal List

6 5 Oct Rain Day    
  12 Oct Fall Break
7 19 Oct Guest Lecture - Lisa Hollenshead

Required

Jacoby et al 2012. Developing a deeper understanding of animal movements and spatial dynamics through novel application of network analyses

Recommended

Jacoby on YouTube

 
8 26 Oct

Discussion

Leader is Jordan Ormand Foster

Liu et al. 2008. Disrupted small world networks in schizophrenia. Homework 4 (Due C#9)
9 2 Nov

Discussion

Leader is Aysha Khan

Brewer et al. 2011. Meditation experience is associated with differences in default mode network activity and connectivity.  
10 9 Nov

Discussion

Leader is Chrysanthi Siarkas

Osgood et al. 2013. Peers and the emergence of alcohol use: Influence and selection processes in adolescent friendship networks.  
11 16 Nov

Discussion

Leader is Danielle DuBois

 

Warschauer 2007. The paradoxical future of digital learning

 

12 23 Nov

Discussion

Leader is Mary Benton

Dunbar et al. 2015. The structure of online social networks mirrors those in the offline world

Homework 5 (Due C#12)

Write a ~1 page essay that compares and contrasts the network models and anlyses presented in two of the papers we have read in class.

13 30 Nov
Wrap up
   
  3 Dec Reading Day
         

Other Resources

Papers

Websites

Brandes et al 2013 What is Network Science? Network Science

Journal of Complex Networks
Proloux et al. 2005. Network thinking in ecology and evolution. TREE Network Science Journal
Borrett et al. 2014. The rise of Network Ecology: Maps of the topic diversity and scientific collaboration. Ecol. Model. Visual Complexity
  Mark Newman
 
   
  EcoNet Website
   
  How Google makes improvements to its seach algorithm
  Digital Footprint Video (ok, not great)

 

 

bio366

Summer 2016

 

Required Resources

1. Smith and Smith (2012) Elements of Ecology (8th edition). Pearson Ed.

2. TurningTechnologies ResponseCard RF LCD (clicker registration site)

Teaching Philosophy;

Bloom's Taxonomy of Intellectual Behavior (1, 2)

Tips on How to Learn

Participation

clicker registration site

see scores for each meeting below

Participation Totals (June 15)

Assignments

EcoPhotos (Project Description, Flickr Group Page)

Multiple Choice Questions (Assignment)

Interesting Ecology Videos

Ecological Careers

banner

Schedule

#
Date
Topic
Readings/Assignments Due
I. Introduction
1

16-May

Nature of Ecology & Earth System (notes)

Syllabus, Ch1, Ch2

Flickr Community Guidelines

II. Individuals
2
17
Individual Organisms: Niches, Conditions, and Resources (notes, participation)
3
18
Physiological Ecology of Plants and Animals (notes, participation)

pp. 68-69; Ch5 (pp. 70-77), Ch 6 (all), & Ch 7 (pp. 119-127)

III. Populations
4
19

4a = Population Properties (preview, notes, participation)

 

Ch 8, 9
5 23

4b = Population Growth (preview, notes, participation)

Life History (preview, notes)

Ch 10, life table example
6 24 EXAM I (Class Questions) Scores, Exam Discussion
IV. Interactions
7
25 Intraspecific Competition (preview ,notes, participation) Ch 11
8

26

Interspecific Competition (preview, notes, participation) Ch 14
  30 Memorial Day  
9
31

Predation (preview, notes, participation)

Required

Ch 15

Optional

Bristle Worm Eats Benthic Jellyfish (Stoner & Layman 2015 and Video)

10

june 1

 

Symbiosis, Parasitism, Mutualisms (preview, notes, participation)

Required

Ch 16

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4BZME8H7-KU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DTrENdWvvM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GAF-AblJpfM

V. Communities
11

2

Community Structure 1 (preview, notes)

Communty Structure 2 (preview, notes)

participation

Required

Ch 17, Ch 18

Optional

Trophic Cascade Video (Wolves in Yellowstone)

The Ecologist Who Threw Starfish | Nautilus 2016

Some Animals Are More Equal than Others: Keystone Species and Trophic Cascades | HHMI Biointeractive 2016 (19:28 min)

 

12
6 Community Dynamics (preview, notes, participation) Ch 19
13
7 EXAM II (class questions) Scores, Exam Discussion
VI. Ecosystems
14
8 Ecosystem Energetics and Organization (preview, notes, participation) Ch 21
15

9

Decomposition and Nutrient Cycling (preview, notes, participation) Ch 22
16 13 Biogeochemical Cycling (preview, notes, participation)

Ch 23; Beedlow et al. 2004, Periodic Table Rap

Suggested:

Peak Phosphorus | Generation Anthropocene (podcast 12 min)

17
14 Ecological Address & Review (notes, participation)  
  15 Reading Day EcoPhoto Reflections and Comments Due
18
16 EXAM III (8 am - 11 pm) (Class Questions) Scores

Interesting Ecology Videos

Conserving the Canopy http://www.ted.com/talks/nalini_nadkani_on_conserving_the_canopy.html

Mate selection in Birds of Paradise (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6gAxbxxmYZ8)

Human Microbiome (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DTrENdWvvM)

Trophic Cascade Video (Wolves in Yellowstone)

Brinicle of Death Video

PBS: Secrets of the Longleaf Pine (video, 56:47)

 

BIOL 366 :: Ecology Laboratory :: Summer 2016

Laboratory Report

Laboratory Report Instructions

Short Report Grading Rubic (Excel)

Full Report Grading Rubric (Excel)

Demographic Cover Sheet (assessment)

How to (seriously) read a scientific paper

 

biol366 biol366 biol366

 

Schedule

Description of the laboratories and their assignment directions are in the class laboratory manual.

#
Day
Topic
Reading/Assignments
1

May 17

Questions due in Class
2
19

Sampling Sedentary Organisms (notes)

Excel Template :: sit file

Short Lab Report (Due Lab 3)

 

3
24

Population Dispersion and Association (notes)

Excel Analysis Template

Required

Early 2004, Ch 2 Fire in the Cathedral

Short Lab Report (Due Lab 4)

Optional

Cape Fear estuary: from river to sea

PBS: Secrets of the Longleaf Pine (video, 56:47)

 

4 26

Forest Ecology I: Hypothesis development and sampling design (notes)

map (google)

Pechenik, Chapter 9

Hypotheses & Sampling Design due in class

 
 

Forest Ecology Laboratory Report

Draft Full Laboratory Report (Due Lab 6)

Revised Full Laboratory Report (Due Lab 8)

Laboratory Report Instructions, Writing Tips and Tricks, Evaluation Rubric

5 31

Forest Ecology II: Sampling

 

Enter the data collected into Excel file & email file to all team members.
6 June 2

Forest Ecology III: Data Analysis (notes)

Pechenik, Chapters 4 & 5

Examples: Forest Data, Forest Analysis1, data in Excel format

7 7

Wetland Communities (notes)

Questions and graph due in class.

Optional

NATURALIST’S NOTEBOOK: CAROLINA BAYS: Another Man’s Treasure

8 9

Indirect Population Measurements

 

9

14

Laboratory Exam

Grading Scheme

Related Links

Land of the Long Leaf Pines Exhibit @ Cape Fear Museum of Science and History

Cape Fear Estuary: From River to Sea

 

BIO 534 :: Advanced Ecology :: Fundamentals of Ecological Modeling

Fall 2016

Schedule

#
Date
Topic
Reading
Homework (due date)

Introduction

1
Aug. 17
Introduction (notes)
H1: Mangel 2006 Math Warm Up (Due Aug. 22) :: (solution)
2

22

 

Models and Science (notes)

Required

BGM Ch1

West Wing Clip - Gall Peters Projection (4 min YouTube Clip)

Suggested

America's Last Top Model (20 min podcast) | 99% Invisible

 

H2: Model ID Assignment (Due Aug. 24)

3
24
Art of Modelling (notes)

 

4
29

System Conceptualization (notes)

H3: Conceptualization (due Aug 31)

Quantitative Modeling

5

31

 

Single State Variables Models: Bathtubs and Populations (notes)
Gotelli Ch1
H4: Problem Set - Gotelli problems 1.2 & 1.3 (due Sept. 14)
Sept.5
Labor Day
6
7 Exam 1 - Take Home    
7
12
Guest Lecture - Case Study    
8
14

Population Regulation and Intraspecific Competition: Logistic Growth (notes)

Gotelli Ch2

H5: Problem Set - Gotelli problems 2.1, 2.2, & 2.3 (due Sept. 19)

9 19 Generalized Control Functions (notes) Bolker Ch3  
10 21

Structured Population Models

(notes, Life Tables Example)

Gotelli Ch3 H6: Problem Set - Gotelli problem 3.2 (due Sept. 26)
11
26
Populations in Space (notes) Stevens Ch4 H7: Problem Set (due Sept. 28)
12

28

Interspecific Competition (notes)

Gotelli Ch5

H8: Problem Set - Gotelli problems 5.1 & 5.2 (due Oct. 3)
13
Oct 3
Predation (notes) Gotelli Ch 6

H9: Problem Set - Gotelli problems 6.1 & 6.2 (due Oct. 5)

H10: Activity for Mutualism (due Oct 5)

14
5
Mutualisms (notes)

 

 
 

6-7

Fall Break
15
10
Three State Varables: Chains & Webs (notes; show) (start reading DMB Ch9 for next class)  
16
12

Environmental Forcing, Parameterization, and Calibration

(notes)

 

Model Evaluation

17 17 Discussion: Confronting Models with Data Fussman et al. 2000: Shertzer et al. 2002  
18
19
Discussion: Model Evaluation

Required

Oreskes 1994; Schmolke et al 2010

Suggested

Spherical Horses & Frictionless Wheels | Engines of our Ingenuity, Podcast 2334

Reading Proposals Due (assignment, proposals)
19
24

Model Analysis: Sensitivity Analysis (notes)

Murdoch et al. 2013  
20 26 Exam 2 - Take Home    

Case Studies

21
31
Network Ecology (notes)  
22
Nov 2
Introduction to Ecological Network Analysis    
23 7 Student Led Reading Discussion - TBD  
24
9
Student Led Reading Discussion - TBD  
25
14

Student Led Reading Discussion -

TBD  
26
16
Student Led Reading Discussion - TBD  
27

21

Student Led Reading Discussion - TBD  
  24 Thanksgiving
28
28
Student Led Reading Discussion - TBD  
29

30

Summary & Conclusions    
 

4

Reading Day

 
Dec 5
Final Exam Time - 11:30-2:30    
         

Additional Resources

SPHERICAL HORSES & FRICTIONLESS WHEELS, Engines of our Ingenuity Podcast 2334

The Scale of Nature: Modeling the Mississippi River | K.D. Cheramie, March 2011

 

BIOL 534 | Advanced Ecology Laboratory | Fundamentals of Ecological Modeling

Fall 2016

Schedule

Date Topic Resources Due Date Solutions
Aug 23

Getting Started with R (notes)

Please do the following:

1. Download and install R on your computer (CRAN).

2. Open R and play with it.

3. Start Lab 1: Introduction to R for Ecological Modeling from Dr. Ben Bolker's website. The following exercises will be due at the end of the next lab period: {2.1, 3.1, 5.1, 5.2, 5.3, 5.4, 8.2, 8.3, 8.4, 8.5, 8.6, 9.2}

4. Explore these resources

R Reference Card

M. Lau's notes

Bolker's website

R Studio

Emacs; Tinn-R; Information about other text editors for R is here;

Plotting Details

DATA

Chlorellagrowth.txt

Intro2.txt

exercises due Lab 2. (Solutions)
30 Lab 2: Practical Programming (notes)

Exercises

Recommended Reading

Nobel 2009; Nice R Code

end of lab (Solutions)
Sept. 6

Lab 4: Single State Variable Models: Exponental Growth & Logistic Growth

 

Shiflet & Shiflet 2006 Module 5: simulation techniques

deSolve Vignette

example plot with multiple lines

Sept. 16

exponential

(Solutions)
13 Lab 4: ...continued      
20 Lab 5: Ricker Model & Chaotic Dynamics Otto&Day-chaos; optional May 1974 Nov. 23 (Solution)
27 Lab 6: Two State Variable Models: Resource-Consumer Models  

Oct. 7

 

(Solution)
Oct. 4 ...continued      
11 Lab 7: Three State Variable Models: Chains and Webs Beisner et al. 2003

Oct. 21

Project Topic Selection Due

(Solution)
18 ...continued      
25 Lab 8: Connecting Models and Data

EggData, RossSeaData

DMB9

no report due  

Nov 1

Work on Projects (No class meeting)      
8 Work on Projects (No class meeting)      
15 Work on Projects (No class meeting)      
22 Work on Projects (No class meeting)      
Nov 30 Project Reports Due (by email)   Project Reports Due (5 pm)  
Dec 6

Project Presentations

(Final Exam Period Lab: 3-6 pm)

 

Project Presentations Due

 
         

 

R Programming Help, Tutorials, & Advice

There are lots of R programming resources on the web. I am collecting a few more useful resources here.

A plea for consistent style! | http://sas-and-r.blogspot.com -- Style guides for writing more readable code.

Google's R Style Guide | Google -- Style guides for writing more readable code.

Functional Programmin via Cupcakes | Stanley Wickham -- Wickham is arguing that we should replace many for-loops with functions. I learned two additional elments: the seq_along() function and the purr library.

R Tutorial for Beginners: A Quick Start-Up Kit | Mitchell A. Sanders -- this is a very terse introduction that assumes a bit of knowledge about computer programming.

R Reference Card | CRAN R-Project

An Introduction to R | CRAN R-Project -- this is a very helpful resource for beginning R coding.

 

 

 

bio602

Spring 2011 Schedule

Date
Topic
Readings
Exercises

13 Jan

No class
18
Introductions

Syllabus

sign up for topics

20

Scientific Origins
25
Ecological Stoichiometry

A. Kormondy (Physical & Chemical Environment - Liebig, Blackman, Shelford)

B. Reiners 1986

27

C. Elser et al. 2000

D. Hillebrand, Helmut; Gamfeldt, Lars; Jonsson, Per R; Matthiesen, Bert. 2009. Consumer diversity indirectly changes prey nutrient content. Mar Ecol Prog Ser 380:33-41 (link)

Feb 1
Biosphere and Gaia

A. Lovelock and Margulis 1974

B. Charlson et al. 1987

3
Ex. 1 Due
8
Density Dependence

A. Kormondy (Populations - Malthus, Verhulst, Birch, Nicholson, Hairston et al.)

B. Caley et al. 1996 OR Murdoch et al. 1994

Exercise 2: Propositional Logic
10
C. Filin, I, Holt, RD, andl Barfield, M. 2008. The Relation of Density Regulation to Habitat Specialization, Evolution of a Species’ Range, and the Dynamics of Biological Invasions.

A link to the paper is:
http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/589459

15
Host-Parasite Interactions

A. Kormondy (Populations: Burkholder, Gause, Connell, Wheeler)

B. May 1983

17
C. TBD
Ex. 2 Due
22
Biodiversity and Ecosystem Fcn

A. Hutchinson 1959

B. Hooper et al. 2005

24
C. TBD
Mar 1
Community Assembly

A. Kormondy (Community - Clements, Braun-Blanquet and Furrer, Ramensky, Gleason)

B. Leibold et al. 2004

3
C. TBD
8
Niche vs. Neutral Theory

A. Hutchinson 1957

B. Hubbell 2005

Exercise 3. 10 Fundamental Principles

 

10

C. Leibold and McPeek 2006

D. TBD

15
Spring Break    
17
Spring Break    
22
Ecosystem Energetics

A. Kormondy (ecosystems - Evans, Transeau, Juday, Lindeman, Clarke, Odum)

B. Polis and Hurd 1996

24
29
Topic A to be selected
31
April 5
Topic B to be selected
7
12
Topic C to be selected
14
19
Fundamental Processes pt 1
21
Easter Break
26
Fundamental Processes pt 2 Scheiner and Willig 2008  
28
Summary and Discussion
Reflection Paper Due
14-May
Commencement

Topic Proposals

1. Spatial Ecology

2. Soil Biodiversity

3. Restoration Ecology

4. Microbial Biodiversity

5. Metabolic Ecology

6. Keystone Species

 

 

 

Systems Ecology :: Summer 2013

This course was co-taught with Dr. John Schramski (UGA) at Beijing Normal University

Course Resources

Software for Ecological Network Analysis

EcoNet

EcoNet (online tool)
enaR: R package

enaR is a professional grade tool for ecological network analysis. It is a package of functions for R that builds on the network and social network analysis packages created by Carter Butts. You can download the software from CRAN.

Vignette (shows how to use software)

Borrett & Lau 2012, EcoSummit Presentation Introducing enaR (ppt)

enaR Reference Card (short list of primary commands)

Example Code (batch_example.r, edge_deletion_ENA_sensitivity.r, sa_example.r)

SCOR formatted data files for examples (neuse_2.dat, neuse_3.dat, neuse_4.dat, neuse_5.dat, avgLanier.dat)

Lecture Notes

Dr. Borrett's Notes

 

Additional Resources Online

Albert Norström explains the basics of systems ecology thinking (YouTube)
Systems Ecology Graduate Program (University of Montana)
Systems Ecology Program (University of Maryland)

 

 

 

Spring 2015

We are meeting Tuesday's at 12:30 pm in the SEE Lab Space. Please join us to disucss current topics and research in Systems Ecology and Ecoinformatics.

 

Invitation

Dr. Borrett is always looking for hardworking and intellectually curious studnets to join the SEE Laboratory's journey of scientific discovery. Studnets can work in the lab at all levels: undergraduate Directed Independnet Studies, honors projects, masters thesis, and PhD disertations. If you are considering joining the lab, please peruse this website and read a few of our recent publications to develop a better understanding of our work. While the scope of our research can be quite broad, I recommend you start with this encyclopedia entry on Network Ecology as much of our work falls in this domain. If this work interests you, please contact Dr. Borrett directly (borretts {@} uncw.edu).

Resources

I am listing a few resources here that new and older studnets may find useful.

Journey into the Unknown, Brian Greene discussess the journey that is science.

Simplfying Complexity, TED talk by Eric Berlow about using network science to undersatand complex systems. In an interesting follow up talk, Dr. Berlow and Sean Gourley illustrate Mapping Ideas Worth Spreading.

Expectations

This page is still under construction, but here are a few guiding principles.

"We write to think, not think to write" Bart Dredge @Austin College. A corrolary of this principle is that unclear writing is evidence of unclear thinking.

Science is a community activity. We publish our work so that it can contribute to the protracted discourse that is science discovery and knowledge construction. Given this position, science does not really exist until it is publically available -- until its published in some form.

All studnets are expected to participate in scheduled laboratory meetings.

DIS

Honors

Masters

PhD

 

 

 

This tab is a collection of resources for academic advising at UNCW.

General

Here are some general resources for students.

Apps for Students (courtesey of UNCW CHHS)

 

Internships

Guidelines for Internships at UNCW

Internship information from the UNCW Career Center. This site includes links to the necessary forms.

For Credit Internships (in Biology)  
Regular Semester Summer Semester

3 hrs work/ week = 1 credit hour

6 hrs/ week = 2 credit hours

9 hrs/ week = 3 credit hours

One Session Enrollment:

12 hrs/ week = 1 credit

Two Session Enrollment:

6 hrs/ week = 1 credit

Courses

There are lots of interesting and useful courses at taught at UNCW. This is a list of courses that I recommend for biology and marine biology majors who are looking for challenging, interesting, and perhaps useful courses outside of the normal track.

Undergraduate Graduate
   
   

Practicing Science

Scientists Have No Defense Against Awe | Choudhry @ Nautilus 2016

The Mistrust of Science | A Gawande @ The New Yorker 2016

Miscellaneous: Teaching, Learning, Communicating

Advice on writing emails to professors.

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Borrett has taught a number of short workshops or tutorials on Ecological Network Analysis. Here are links to the workshop pages and course materials

2016 September. @ECSA56. Ecological Network Analysis Tutorial

2016 May. @International Society for Ecological Modelling. Introduction to Ecological Network Analysis

2015 August. @Ecological Society of America. Introduction to Ecological Network Analysis

2011 March @ Northern Arizona University: Workshop: Introduction to Ecological Network Analysis