Syllabus—Spring 2011

University of North Carolina Wilmington (UNCW)

 

PLS 339: Political Systems of Asia

 

Days and Times: Tuesday/Thursday: 11:00am-12:15pm

Location: FR 1014

 

Congress Party poster featuring the Gandhi Dynasty (Sonia, Rajiv, Indira)

Kerala, India (Tan, 2008)

 

Professor:  Paige Johnson Tan, Ph.D.

 

Phone:  910-962-3221

E-mail: tanp@uncw.edu

Course Homepage: http://people.uncw.edu/tanp/PLS339c.html

Office Hours:  Tuesdays/Thursdays 12:30pm - 1:45pm and by appointment

Office Location: 257 Leutze Hall

 

 

Course Introduction:

 

This course provides a survey of the domestic politics of the Asian region.  The course is organized into five parts.  First, we introduce the course, its aims, requirements, and structure.  Second, the course considers the historical background of government and politics in Asia by looking at pre-colonial systems of government, encounters with the West, colonialism, and national liberation movements.  Third, the course begins a survey of politics in selected Asian nations.  Generally, this section of the course moves country by country.  However, country studies are intended to introduce broader issues in comparative politics for consideration.  Fourth, the course continues by considering Asian modes of economic development.  Fifth, we conclude with a brief study of the foreign policies of major Asian powers China, Japan, and India.

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Course Readings:

Additional reading, either online or on reserve through Blackboard Learn, as assigned in the course schedule.  Access our class page on Blackboard Learn by logging in to http://learn.uncw.edu/.

 

In addition to the required course books and online readings, students are encouraged to read one quality international/Asian news source, such as the New York Times or the BBC on a regular basis.  We will discuss current events in class; keeping up with what is going on in the region will help students to integrate what they are learning in the course to what is happening in the “real world.” 

 

In addition to reading one quality international/Asian news source, students are further encouraged to examine media from a variety of countries.  Asian dailies such as India’s The Hindu, China’s People’s Daily, Japan’s Asahi Shimbun or Mainichi Shimbun, Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post, Taiwan’s Taipei Times, Thailand’s Nation, the Philippines’ ABS-CBNNews.com, Indonesia’s Jakarta Post, and Singapore’s Straits Times will all provide insight into regional affairs.  Australia’s newspapers, such as the Sydney Morning Herald, also carry excellent Asian coverage.

 

Election poster for ruling Communists, Kerala, India (Tan, 2009)

 

Course Requirements:

 

Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, a map quiz, several papers, and a final exam.  The distribution of the final course grade from the various assignments is:

 

 

This course operates on the principle of “continuous assessment.”  This means that students are not placed in the difficult position of having their entire course grades riding on the grade of any one particular assignment (like a “make-or-break” final exam).  Instead, students’ grades are determined on a broader basis in terms of the students’ overall work throughout the semester.  A description of the various assignments on which students will be assessed follows.

 

Class participation.  In the old days, students were seen to be an empty vessel into which the professor poured his or her knowledge (more than likely, it was “his”—since it was the old days!).  However, this old-model of education has come under severe challenge in recent years.  Rote memorization is now seen to offer little to students.  How often have you “crammed” for a test and then forgotten everything you learned within a few weeks (or, gasp, days)?

 

The philosophy behind this course is that students learn better when that learning is active.  Students are expected to attend class (with a maximum of two absences for the semester).  They are also expected to participate in class discussions, considering, manipulating, testing, and questioning the topics presented in class in order to develop their knowledge of the field of Asian Politics and their familiarity with the tools and concepts of Political Science more broadly.  Active class participation by all students has the advantage of helping to foster tolerance for divergent viewpoints and developing students’ abilities to formulate arguments in a well-reasoned manner.   Class participation is worth 10% of the final grade.

 

Map quiz.  Americans in the 18-to-24 age group came next to last in a nine-nation survey of geographic literacy conducted by the National Geographic Society in 2002.  This course aims to tackle this problem by encouraging students’ awareness of and familiarity with Asian countries, regions, cities, and geographic features.  The map quiz is worth 5% of the final grade.

 

Self-criticism. As part of their study of China’s Cultural Revolution, students will write a self-criticism, much as people in China were compelled to do during this time period.  Students will imagine themselves as a Chinese person, forced to confess past errors in thought and action.  The self-criticism is worth 10% of the final grade.

 

Issue presentation.  In order to develop their mastery of a specific issue of Asian politics as well as their abilities in public speaking, students will give a ten-to-fifteen minute presentation on an issue of significance in contemporary Asian politics.  Issues can deal with the politics of a single party or can compare politics across a selection of Asian nations.  Presentations will be evaluated on the quality of the thesis and outline of the presentation; the effectiveness of the PowerPoint; the speakers' adherence to the time limit; the speakers' style, mastery of the material, and use of quality sources; and the speakers' critical engagement with the issue.  More information on what makes a good/bad presentation can be found on this PowerPoint.

 

On your thesis, please note that a thesis is not a topic, nor is it a general question. The best thesis is going to be the answer to a question, preferably a how or why question (this will keep you focused on analyzing rather than describing).  Example: It has proven difficult to put democracy in place in Cambodia because of a) the country's long authoritarian tradition, b) elite manipulation of the political field, c) weak rule of law, and d) international disinterest. This thesis then provides the organization to your presentation. You spend three to four minutes talking about a, then b, then c, then d. Illustrate with examples so that your listeners can follow, understand, and be persuaded.

 

Students are free to develop their own topics for the presentations and may work on a country or countries of their choice.  Some suggested topics follow to spur student thinking about possible topics.  Many of these could be done on a variety of countries. I have included some suggestions in parentheses.

Please note that students are quite free in their choice of topic but note that it must touch on domestic politics/policy or international relations.  Geishas are interesting but not an appropriate topic for a presentation in this 300-level course on politics.

 

Op-ed piece  In order to develop their skills in constructing concise arguments about international topics, students are asked to write an imaginary “op-ed piece” for the Washington Post or another major news outlet on an issue of contemporary domestic politics or international relations in Asia.  Specific topics for the op-ed will be discussed as the deadline draws nearer.  Op-eds should be 800-1,000 words, or three-to-four pages, in length.  The op-ed assignment is worth 15% of the final course grade. 

 

Book Review.  Students are asked to compose an eight-page essay reviewing the assigned book, Dead Season, by Alan Berlow.  This assignment is not a book report.  Students are asked to interact with and evaluate the book, rather than merely describing its contents.  The book review is worth 15% of the final grade.

 

Final exam.  Students will have an in-class final exam.  The exam will have both short-answer and essay questions and will take at most one hour and fifteen minutes to complete.  The exam is worth 25% of the final course grade. 

 

Getting Help

 

Students are encouraged to talk to me if they feel they need assistance with the course material.  I can be reached by e-mail at tanp@uncw.edu or by phone at 910-962-3221.  I am in my office most days at least 9-3 (with the exception of the times I am teaching).  Dedicated office hours are Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:45pm.

 

The University Learning Center (ULC) also provides assistance to students in writing, math, and general academic skills. The ULC is located on the first floor of Westside Hall (WE 1056); phone 962-7857; web www.uncw.edu/ulc; hours: Mon–Thur 8am–9pm; Fri 8am–5pm; Sun 3pm–9pm.

 

 

Workshop featuring painting of untouchables hero, Dr. Ambedkar, Bangalore, Karnataka (Tan, 2008)

 

 

Course Policies

 

Academic Honesty

 

This instructor believes academic honesty is the foundation of the entire enterprise of a university. Only in an environment of honesty can genuine learning occur and good citizenship be fostered.  For further information, students should consult the online UNCW Code of Student Life at http://www.uncw.edu/stuaff/odos/documents/0910CodeofStudentLife_FINAL.pdf (The Honor Code begins on page 6 in the 2010 version).  Students should also feel free to ask the instructor any questions they may have about academic honesty.  Because academic honesty is treated as a serious matter, the course policy is one of zero tolerance for academic DIShonesty. 

 

The core principle of the Academic Honor Code is that student work represents the original work of the student.  For this reason, plagiarism, using the work of another without proper citation, and cheating, the unauthorized use of information during an examination, are prohibited. 

 

The Academic Honor Code works for both students and teachers.  Students can expect that the instructor will treat them in a fair, honest, and impartial manner.  The instructor also expects students to deal with her and with one another honestly.  Plagiarism and cheating are violations of academic honesty because they steal from the original creator of the work.  In addition, they violate the relationship of honesty between student and teacher as the student attempts to pass off work as his or her own which was produced by another.  Further, plagiarism and cheating violate the bond of honesty among students themselves.  Students who produce their assignments through long, hard work are being violated by those taking a shortcut through the misappropriation of another’s work or knowledge.  Most sadly, students who violate academic honesty cheat themselves of the chance to learn.

 

Please note two particular policies the instructor follows:

1) Work for this course must be yours, and it must be original.  If you wish to work on a project you have previously worked on for another class, you must add at least as much content as the assignment requires that is new and original for this class.

 

2) You may receive help on your written assignments (not tests) from your roommate, significant other, parents, the University Learning Center, or a passerby on the street.  The process of reading and revising your work based on the comments of others is an important part of how we learn and improve.

 

Contacting the Instructor

 

Students are encouraged to call or e-mail with questions, or stop by office hours (listed above).  I endeavor to be available to assist you with your course work. It’s my job.  As a hint, e-mails are likely to guarantee a quicker response than phone messages.  I am most happy to set up an appointment for a meeting in addition to those times listed as office hours.  However, because I have a young child at home, students must understand that there are limits on my time.  A note on courtesy: When students receive assistance through any one of these extra-class channels, they should be sure to thank the instructor for her time, thought, and effort.  This little trick will serve you well in the future. It is an expected part of social etiquette.

 

Late Papers

 

PLEASE PAY ATTENTION TO THIS POLICY!

 

Students are encouraged to plan in advance to make time to complete assignments.  Things come up during the semester; relatives require our attention, cars break down, and students get sick.  Students should begin their assignments early enough to allow for these foreseeable and unforeseeable eventualities.  The instructor does not wish to receive any late assignments during the semester.

 

Papers are due at the start of class on the date listed on the syllabus.  Each twenty-four hours that a paper is late may result in a penalty of one letter grade.  Late papers must be submitted by e-mail (pasted into your message and attached in Word format) and must receive confirmation of receipt from the instructor to be considered "turned in."  For your protection, submit your paper from an e-mail account which will keep a record of your outgoing e-mail. With this, you could demonstrate a true attempt to submit the paper that somehow disappears into the electronic ether.  Do not submit papers to the instructor’s faculty snail mailbox, the department secretary, or under the instructor’s office door.  After submitting papers electronically, students should bring a print-out of the late assignment to the next class meeting.  Late assignments will not be graded on the same schedule as assignments submitted on time.  Under no circumstances should students miss class to complete an assignment.

 

Extra Credit

 

Students are invited to attend lectures, panels, and movies on campus that deal with international affairs.  Just check with the instructor beforehand as to whether  you've picked a good event.  After the event, submit a one- to two-page single-space write-up that deals with your reactions to the presentation. How does it relate to what we are doing in class? How does it relate to other things you've studied?  Did you agree or disagree with the speaker/s argument?  What did the presentation make you think about?  This extra credit will be used toward class participation or in the calculation of final grades in borderline cases.

 

Tardiness

 

Students are strongly encouraged to show respect for fellow students and the instructor by arriving for class on time. Late arrivals disturb fellow students and disrupt the learning process.  It is better to come in late than not to come at all, but try to be respectful of classmates by making arrangements to be in class and in your seat at the start of class.

 

Excused Absences

 

An excused absence is one that is discussed with the professor IN ADVANCE and for which documentation can be provided.  Only for excused absences will the professor allow work to be made up.  All make-up work will be done at the instructor’s convenience.

 

Disabilities

 

The instructor understands that some students may have need of accommodation (for example, extended testing time or a quiet testing locale) due to a disability.  If you feel that you are in need of an accommodation, please contact Disability Services in Westside Hall to make the appropriate arrangements.  The phone number is 910-962-7555. 

 

Electronic Devices

 

Students are permitted to use laptop computers during class to access PowerPoints, online notes, or to type their own course notes.  Laptops are not to be used for surfing the internet or checking e-mail.  Students with computers are encouraged to sit in the back of the classroom to avoid disturbing fellow students. During periods of class discussion, computers should be closed to ensure adequate attention and participation.  Obviously, when tests and quizzes are being administered, laptops are not permitted.  Use of cellphones, including texting, is never permitted. PLEASE NOTE: If students are found to be using electronic devices in a manner inconsistent with the professor’s assessment of the best environment for group learning, they may be penalized with a one-letter grade reduction in their final course grade.

 

 

 

China Looks Ahead. Poster, Stefan Landsberger's poster pages.  http://www.iisg.nl/landsberger/

 

World Wide Web Resources

 

The web has a bounty of information for research on Asian politics (not all of it credible—be a careful consumer!!!).  Below, students will find a selection of websites.  Students should consult the instructor if they require any assistance in finding additional web resources on particular topics or countries. 

 

Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation Forum (APEC) http://www.apecsec.org.sg  

Asia Society Asia Source Homepage http://www.asiasource.org 

**Asian Studies at ANU http://coombs.anu.edu.au/WWWVL-AsianStudies.html 

Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) http://www.asean.or.id 

BBC http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/

Brookings Institution http://www.brook.edu/

Channel News Asia  http://www.channelnewsasia.com 

China Daily http://www.chinadaily.net 

China Embassy to the United States http://www.china-embassy.org/               

China Human Rights in China http://www.hrichina.org

China Internet Guide for China Studies—Politics http://sun.sino.uni-heidelberg.de/igcs/igpol.htm

China Ministry of Foreign Affairs http://www.fmprc.gov.cn  

China News Digest http://www.cnd.org/CND-Global/CND-Global.new.html

China People’s Daily http://english.peopledaily.com.cn

China: A Country Study, U.S. Library of Congress http://lcweb2.loc.gov/frd/cs/cntoc.html   

China: Political Resources on the Net http://www.politicalresources.net/china.htm

Chinese Military Power Page http://www.comw.org/cmp/

CNN Asia news http://edition.cnn.com/ASIA 

Comparative Connections http://www.csis.org/pacfor/ccejournal.html

ElectionGuide http://www.ifes.org/eguide/elecguide.htm

Embassy, the Electronic Embassy http://www.embassy.org/ (find embassies in Washington, DC)

Foreign Affairs http://www.foreignaffairs.org/

Foreign Policy http://www.foreignpolicy.com/

Freedom House (NGO) http://www.freedomhouse.org/

Hong Kong South China Morning Post  http://www.scmp.com

Hong Kong WWWVL http://www.asiawind.com/hkwwwvl

Human Rights Watch/Asia http://www.hrw.org/about/divisions/asia.html

India Bharatiya Janata Party http://www.bjp.org

India Frontline http://www.flonnet.com

India Ministry of Foreign Affairs http://www.meadev.nic.in

India Prime Minister’s Office http://pmindia.nic.in

India Hindu http://www.hinduonline.com

India Times of India http://www.timesofindia.com

Indian Embassy, Washington, DC http://www.indianembassy.org

Indonesia Jakarta Post  http://www.thejakartapost.com 

International Affairs WWWVL http://www.etown.edu/vl 

Inter-Parliamentary Union—IPU http://www.ipu.org/

Japan Daily Yomiuri  http://www/yomiuri.co.jp/index-e.htm

Japan Embassy Washington, DC http://www.embjapan.org

Japan Guide from Stanford http://jguide.stanford.edu

Japan Mainichi Shimbun  http://mdn.mainichi.co.jp

Malaysia Ministry of Foreign Affairs http://www.kln.gov.my/index1.html 

Malaysia Prime Minister’s Office http://www.smpke.jpm.my/ 

Missions to the UN  (with links to missions’ websites) http://www.un.int/index-en/webs.html  

New York Times http://www.nytimes.com (site requires registration, but it’s free)

Philippines Department of Foreign Affairs http://www.dfa.gov.ph 

Political Resources on the Net http://www.politicalresources.net/

Singapore Ministry of Foreign Affairs http://www.mfa.gov.sg/ 

Singapore Straits Times  http://straitstimes.asia1.com.sg 

South China Sea WWWVL http://www.middlebury.edu/SouthChinaSea 

Taiwan Government Information Office http://www.roc-taiwan.org

Taiwan WWWVL http://peacock.tnjc.edu.tw/taiwan-wwwvl.html

Thailand Ministry of Foreign Affairs http://www.mfa.go.th 

Thailand Bangkok Post http://www.bangkokpost.net   

Thailand Nation http://www.nationmultimedia.com 

Tibet Government in Exile at http://www.tibet.com 

Timor Lorosae (East Timor) http://www.easttimor.com 

United Nations (Official) http://www.un.org/  

US Department of State (Official) http://www.state.gov 

Vietnam News Agency http://www.vnagency.com.vn/vnaE4.htm

World Bank (Official) http://www.worldbank.org 

 

A modern skyline, China

Scholarly Journals

 

As wonderful as the web is for finding information, scholarly journals still form the backbone of our academic work.  Some journals helpful for the study of Asia and international affairs are listed below:

 

Asian Journal of Political Science

Asian Perspective

Asian Survey

Australian Journal of International Affairs

Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars

Comparative Political Studies

Comparative Politics

Contemporary Southeast Asia

Current History

Electoral Studies

Foreign Affairs

Foreign Policy

International Security

Journal of Contemporary Asia

Journal of Democracy

PS Political Science

Pacific Affairs

Pacific Review

Party Politics

Perspectives on Politics

Political Science Quarterly

Survival

Third World Quarterly

Washington Quarterly

World Politics

 

 

Communist March, Kerala, India (Tan, 2008)

Course Schedule:

 

I. INTRODUCTION

 

JAN 13 COURSE INTRODUCTION: THEMES IN THE STUDY OF ASIAN POLITICS

Reading: Charlton, pp. 1-9.

Introduce course schedule and assignments. 

Consider: Thomas Friedman, "The New Sputnik," New York Times, September 26, 2008.  http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/27/opinion/27friedman.html and Minxin Pei, "Asia's Rise," Foreign Policy, July/August 2009, pp. 32-36.  The Pei reading is available in the "course content" "reserve readings" section of this class's website on Blackboard Learn (http://learn.uncw.edu/).  The file is named Pei.AsiasRise.pdf.

 

II.  THE HISTORICAL BACKGROUND

 

A.  PRECOLONIAL SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT

 

JAN 18 THE PRECOLONIAL SYSTEMS OF CHINA AND JAPAN

Reading:  Charlton, Ch. 3 and 4, also pp. 128-132. 

Recommended: Franz Schurmann and Orville Schell, eds. The China Reader: Imperial China, New York: Vintage 1967, p. 34-66.  Find this in the reserves folder of the class content section of our Blackboard Learn course website.  The name of the file is SchurmannSchell.Confucianpattern.pdf.

Discuss:  Chinese imperial system of government and Asia’s Confucian heritage. Consider China's and Japan's people.

Resource: State Department Background Notes on China and Japan.

Looking ahead:  Handout on requirements for map quiz.

 

JAN 20 INDIANIZED KINGDOMS AND ISLAMIC SULTANATES

Reading: Charlton, Ch. 2. 

Recommended: Steinberg, David Joel, ed.  In Search of Southeast Asia: A Modern History.  Honolulu:  University of Hawaii Press, 1987, pp. 37-48, 60-95 (henceforth referred to as Steinberg).  This may be referred to as “Religious Life,” “Buddhist Kings,” “Vietnamese Emperors,” “Malay Sultans,” “Javanese Kings,” and “Spanish Governors” in Blackboard Learn.  These pages are in multiple readings the file names of which begin with Steinberg.InSearchOfSoutheastAsia.

Discuss: India and Southeast Asia's peoples as well as the traditional kingdom and sultanate.

Resource: State Department Background Notes on India and Indonesia.

Looking ahead: Introduce issues presentations. Choose groups/topics.

 

B.  ENCOUNTERS WITH THE WEST AND COLONIALISM

 

JAN 25  CHINA: IMPERIAL BREAKDOWN AND THE 1911 REVOLUTION

Reading: Charlton, Ch. 6. 

Discuss: Virtual hand-out on Chinese romanization and Asian names.

Looking ahead: Choose issue/groups by next time.

 

The Meiji Emperor, Japan

 

JAN 27 JAPAN: THE MEIJI REFORMS

Reading: Charlton, Ch. 7.

Discuss: Western penetration of Japan/Japanese initiatives and responses.

Sample Exam Question: Compare Japanese and Chinese responses to the West. How were they the same? How were they different? And, why? 

Virtual handout: The Importance of Writing Well

Recommended reading for the future: Ian Buruma, Inventing Japan: 1853-1964, New York: Modern Library Chronicles, 2003.

Looking ahead: If you didn't submit your issue/group by today, Dr. Tan will assign them before class next time.

Looking ahead: Map quiz next time.

Comments cards: How is class going so far?

 

FEB 1 COLONIALISM IN SOUTH AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

Reading: Start Charlton, Ch. 5.

Discuss: Economic and political effects of colonialism in Southeast Asia.

Resource: State Department Background Notes: Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand.
MAP QUIZ.

Looking ahead: Assignment of dates for issue presentations. Also, look at the following PowerPoint to learn more about how to give a good presentation: GoodPresBadPres.ppt.

 

C.  NATIONALISM AND MOVEMENTS FOR INDEPENDENCE

 

FEB 3 CHINA: CIVIL WAR AND THE THOUGHT OF MAO ZEDONG

Reading:  Ross Marlay and Clark Neher, Patriots & Tyrants: Ten Asian Leaders, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999, pp. 25-46 (on Mao).  This is listed as

 

FEB 8 CHINA: FOUNDING OF A REPUBLIC

Reading:  Make sure you're getting started on Son of the Revolution.

Watch DVD: Founding of a Republic (Film is 2:18)

 

FEB 10 CHINA:  FOUNDING OF A REPUBLIC

Reading: Work on Son of the Revolution.

Watch DVD: Founding of a Republic

 

FEB 15 INDIA: HIND SWARAJ

Conclude discussion of Founding a Republic.

Reading: Finish Charlton, Ch. 5.  Ross Marlay and Clark Neher, Patriots & Tyrants: Ten Asian Leaders, Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 1999, pp. 271-296 (on Gandhi).  Blackboard Learn: MarlayNeher.GandhiSpiritualNationalist.pdf.

Where are we in the course? Review

STUDENT PRESENTATION #1

 

FEB 17  SOUTHEAST ASIA: VIETNAM: THE LONG REVOLUTION

Reading: Jeffrey Race, War Comes to Long An, Berkeley: University of California Press, 1972, pp. xxiv-2 and Ch. 4.  Blackboard Learn: Race.LongAn.pdf.

Looking ahead: Cultural Revolution self-criticism due in one week. 

Looking ahead: What makes a good student presentation?

Resource: State Department Background Notes Vietnam.

Sample Exam Question: Why were different paths to independence followed in India, Vietnam, and China?

STUDENT PRESENTATION #2

 

FEB 22  CHINA: POLITICS AND ECONOMICS UNDER MAO ZEDONG, 1949-1976

Reading: Liang Heng and Judith Shapiro, Son of the Revolution (first half)

 

FEB 24 CHINA: THE CULTURAL REVOLUTION

Reading: Liang Heng and Judith Shapiro, Son of the Revolution (finish).   You must have done your reading of Son of the Revolution or you will be asked to leave class. It is not fair for students who have done the reading to do the heavy lifting and thinking for those who haven't.

CULTURAL REVOLUTION SELF-CRITICISM DUE TODAY.

Sample Exam Question: How would Mao describe democracy in the People’s Republic of China?  Do you agree that Mao’s system was democratic? (Hint: You need a definition of democracy to answer this question.)

 

III.  CONTEMPORARY ASIAN GOVERNMENT AND POLITICS

 

MAR 1 JAPAN: DEMOCRATIC INSTITUTIONS AND LIBERAL DEMOCRATIC PARTY RULE

Reading:  Charlton, Ch. 9. 

Looking ahead: Book review assignment. 

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 3

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 4

 

MAR 3  SOUTHEAST ASIA: MILITARY RULE: THAILAND, INDONESIA, AND BURMA

Reading:  "Thailand," Robert Dayley and Clark D. Neher, Southeast Asia in the New International Era, Boulder: Westview, 2010, 23-64 (Blackboard Learn: DayleyNeher.Thailand.pdf).  Update on Burma: Economist, "Slowly, the Army Eases Its Grip," November 6, 2010 (Blackboard Learn: Economist.MyanmarElection.pdf.).

Sample Exam Question: Why has military rule been so prevalent in the developing world?

Resource: State Department Background Notes: Thailand, Burma, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 5

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 6

 

MAR 8 INDIA: FAULTLINES IN AN ELECTORAL DEMOCRACY

Reading:  Finish, Charlton, Ch. 9.  Remember, Charlton, Ch. 2.  See Lydia Polgreen, "Politicians in India Turn against One Another," New York Times, October 7, 2009 http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/07/world/asia/07india.html?_r=1&emc=eta1.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 7

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 8

 

Monk's begging bowl, Buddhist monastery, Siem Reap, Cambodia (Tan, 2004)

 

MAR 10  ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT: JAPAN, KOREA, TAIWAN, AND SINGAPORE

Reading:  Charlton, Ch. 13.  Reading:  Gordon P. Means, "Soft Authoritarianism in Malaysia and Singapore," Journal of Democracy, Vol. 7, No. 4, 1996 (Means.SoftAuthinMalaysiaandSingapore).  "Exporting Vietnam," New York Times, December 24, 2009, http://www.nytimes.com/slideshow/2009/12/24/business/global/exportslide_index.html?ref=multimedia

Recommended: Hans Rosling, "Asia's Rise: How and When," TED, November 2009, http://www.ted.com/talks/hans_rosling_asia_s_rise_how_and_when.html.  Rosling is rated "jaw-dropping" by TED viewers.

Resource: State Department Background Notes Korea, Taiwan, and Singapore.

STUDENT PRESENTATION #9

 

MAR 15, 17 Spring Break. No class.

 

MAR 22  SOUTHEAST ASIA: CAMBODIA: POLITICS AS TRAGEDY

Video: The Killing Fields.

Reading: David P. Chandler.  Brother Number One.  Boulder:  Westview, 1992, pp. 112-164.  Chandler.BrotherNumberOne. Get started on Berlow’s Dead Season for next week.

Resource: State Department Background Notes Cambodia.

 

MAR 24 SOUTHEAST ASIA: CAMBODIA: POLITICS AS TRAGEDY

Video: The Killing Fields.

Reading: Alan Berlow, Dead Season (first half).

 

MAR 29 SOUTHEAST ASIA: PHILIPPINES: DYSFUNCTIONAL DEMOCRACY

Reading:  Alan Berlow, Dead Season (second half).You must have done your reading of Berlow or you will be asked to leave class. It is not fair for students who have done the reading to do the heavy lifting and thinking for those who haven't.

Looking ahead: Introduce requirements for op-ed assignment.

Book reviews due in one week.

Resource: State Department Background Notes Philippines.

 

MAR 31  SOUTHEAST ASIA: PHILIPPINES: DYSFUNCTIONAL DEMOCRACY

Continue Discussion of Alan Berlow, Dead Season.

Sample Exam Question:  Evaluate the quality of Filipino democracy.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 10

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 11

 

APR 5 CHINA: PARTY STATE AND ECONOMIC REFORM

Reading: Charlton, Ch. 10. 

Book reviews due today.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 12

 

APR 7 JAPAN: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC CHALLENGES OF A MATURE ECONOMY

Reading:  None for today.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 13

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 14

 

APR 12 INDIA: POSTERCHILD FOR GLOBALIZATION

Reading:  Steve Hamm, Bangalore Tiger, New York: McGraw Hill, 2007, 1-29.  (This is in Blackboard Learn in two parts Hamm.BangaloreTiger.pdf and Hamm.BangaloreTiger2.pdf.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 15

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 16

 

APR 14 INDIA, CHINA, AND JAPAN: DECAY OF ONE-PARTY RULE

Reading:  Charlton, Ch. 12.  Ross Terrill, "Mao and All That." The Weekly Standard.  August 16, 2010 (Blackboard Learn as Terrill.MaoHistory.pdf).  New reading: Larry Diamond, "Why East Asia--Including China--Will Turn Democratic Within a Generation," The Atlantic, January 24, 2012.   http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/01/why-east-asia-including-china-will-turn-democratic-within-a-generation/251824/.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 17

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 18

Op-ed due next week.

Where are we in the course? Review

 

APR 19 Issues in Asia

Reading: None for today.

Watch Al Jazeera English snippets on issues in current Asian politics.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 19
 

APR 21 Easter holiday. No class.

 

V.  INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE ASIAN REGION

 

APR 26 CHINA IN WORLD AFFAIRS

Reading: The Washington Quarterly has periodic, good pieces on China's foreign policy. See http://www.twq.com.  Also, see China's Foreign Ministry online for a wealth of English-language information http://www.fmprc.gov.cn/eng/.

STUDENT PRESENTATION # 20

OP-ED DUE

Thailand, Temple on the Grounds of the Royal Palace (Tan, 1989)

 

 

APR 28 JAPAN AND INDIA IN WORLD AFFAIRS

Reading:  Japan’s online Ministry of Foreign Affairs has an abundance of English-language information on Japanese foreign policy.  Try http://www.mofa.go.jp/.   Further information on India’s foreign policy can be found at the Indian Embassy in Washington, DC at http://www.indianembassy.org/policy/Foreign_Policy/fp.htm

 

TUES MAY 10 FINAL EXAM 11:30am-12:45pm  See http://people.uncw.edu/tanp/PLS339Review.html.

 

 

Dusty town, Tamil Nadu, India (Tan, 2008)

 

You did it.

Hopefully, you've learned a lot about Asia's politics this semester.

Have a good summer!

 

Last updated: February 4, 2011.

Back to Dr. Tan's homepage: http://people.uncw.edu/tanp/