Introduction to Computer Programming: Squeak Etoys
CSC 112-001, Fall 2013
Syllabus

(DRAFT 15 August 2013)

Course Schedule

Description

From the catalog:

CSC 112. Introduction to Computer Programming (3) Prerequisite: MAT 111 or 115. An introduction to programming in a high-level language for students who are not computer science majors. Algorithms, computer systems, data representation, survey of computer applications, elementary programming techniques, debugging and verification of programs… May be repeated once for credit under a different subtitle.

Text

Please consult the following Squeak Etoys references:

http://www.squeakland.org/

http://waveplace.com/resources/tutorials/

CG_squeak_quickguidepg1.pdf

CG_squeak_quickguidepg2.pdf

http://www.mttcs.org/Projekte/Squeak/material/i3learning.pdf

 

http://wiki.squeakland.org/index.php/LearningWithEtoysI3

http://www.gosargon.com/EtoysReferenceManualV0.8.pdf

 

Etoys-To-Go-5.0.zip

Instructor

Contact information

Professor Gene A. Tagliarini

CIS 2038

tagliarinig@uncw.edu

(910) 962-7572

Office hours

M, W and F, 9:00-10:50 AM, and M & W 2:00-4:00 PM

Other office hours may be arranged by appointment.

Open Laboratories

CIS 2006 and Bear Hall Room 165 (Times TBD early in the semester. Typically at least 7:00-10:00 PM Sunday-Thursday plus additional hours on Saturday and Sunday.)

Grading

Weighting

Your final grade will be determined based upon your performance on ten programming assignments (10 programs x 3.5% each = 35%), two intermediate tests (2 tests* 20% each = 40% total), and the final examination (25% of the final grade). All tests will be conducted in-class and will require the student to create program content using Squeak Etoys. Since all tests will involve programming, they will be conducted during scheduled class periods in the class/lab area.

Test schedule

The tests will be given according to the following schedule:

            Test                                         Date

            Test I                                       4 October  2013, Friday

            Test II                                      1 November  2013, Friday

Final Exam                             11 December 2013, Wednesday, 11:30 AM - 2:30 PM

Grade scale

Your final grade will be determined according to the following scale:

            Final average              Grade 

            90-100                         A

            80-89.999                    B

            70-79.999                    C

            60-69.999                    D

            less than 60                 F

In addition to an exceptional performance on the intermediate tests and final exam, a final grade of "A" will require that the student's programs provide all specified functionality and documentation.

 

The instructor reserves the right, solely at his own discretion, to curve grades.

Incomplete grades

Incomplete grades are given only very rarely and only when the student is

  1. Otherwise passing the course,
  2. Able to complete the work of the course entirely on his/her own, and
  3. Prevented from completing the course by verified unforeseen circumstances beyond the control of the student. 

The instructor MUST be able to certify all three of these factors to the department chair before assigning a grade of "I". 

Course Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

  1. Students develop understanding of basic computer programming concepts including problem representation, algorithm development, and program implementation.
  2. Students develop problem-solving techniques to describe and understand problems, think through what is known (input), what is unknown (desired output) and what must be done to transform input into desired output (process), leading to geometric problem representation and finally coding.
  3. Students learn computer program elements to enable sequences, selections, iterations and modularizations of operations.
  4. Students learn how to use and manipulate collections of objects.
  5. Students learn to implement algorithms to solve a variety of problems including processing collections, statistical calculations, and modeling systems of interacting objects.
  6. Students learn modular programming and incremental program development.

Mapping SLOs to Course Requirements and Measurement Instruments

Evidence to indicate progress toward the course SLOs is accumulated by various performance measures including programming assignments and tests. The association between the SLOs and the measures is indicated in the following table:

 

 

Measure

SLO

Test 1

Test 2

Final Exam

Programs

1. a. Problem representation

X

X

X

P1-10

1. b. Algorithm development

X

X

X

P1-10

1. c. Program implementation

X

X

X

P1-10

2. Problem-solving skills

X

X

X

P1-10

3. a. Sequences

X

X

X

P1-10

3. b. Selections

X

X

X

P2-10

3. c. Iterations

 

X

X

P3-10

3. d. Modules

 

X

X

P4-10

4. Collections

 

X

X

P5-10

5. a. Algorithms for collections

 

X

X

P5-10

5. b. Statistics

 

X

X

P5-10

5. c.

Interacting objects

 

 

X

P5-10

6. a. Modular programming

 

 

X

P5-10

6. b. Incremental program development

 

 

X

P5-10

 

Key dates

Important scheduling items and key academic dates can be found at http://www.uncw.edu/reg/calendars.htm.

 

Understanding the Schedule

A tentative schedule is available online. At the discretion of the instructor and based upon student interests, the schedule may be adapted to include some alternative topics. You should explore the Web to supplement class discussions. Please express leadership by taking the initiative to read about areas if interest without waiting for specific reading assignments to study a topic that attracts your attention. There will not be time in class to discuss everything of interest of to each student, so you must plan for some independent study. In addition, you should allocate time for office hours visits as appropriate. If you have questions regarding topics in the course please ask during class, e-mail the instructor, or visit during office hours.

 

Demonstrations of functioning programs are due on the dates shown in the schedule. Late penalties of 20%, 60%, and 100% apply for assignments delivered up to 24 hours late, more than 24 but less than 48 hours late, and more than 48 hours late, respectively.

Attendance Policy

Regular attendance and vigorous participation in class are expected but not required.  However, if you desire the "benefit of the doubt" in any matter related to your grade in the class, you will routinely be present, ask relevant questions, and cooperate with the instructor as well as the course objectives.  Each student is personally responsible for material covered during each class meeting.

Americans with Disabilities Act

If you have a disability and need reasonable accommodation in this course, you should inform the instructor of this fact in writing within the first week of class or as soon as possible.  If you have not already done so, you must register with the Office of Disability Services in Westside Hall (ext. 3746) and obtain a copy of your Accommodation Letter.  You should then meet with your instructor to make mutually agreeable arrangements based on the recommendations of the Accommodation Letter.